Stare Into the Poppy River

(Stare Into the Poppy River was created as part of San Diego’s Makers Quarter “SILO” project located at 15th and F. April 5th, Makers Quarter hosted “Craft Beer + Bites” which was the public unveiling of the finished mural).

I’ve always been drawn to the poppy, whose beauty is released like a single breath the moment it’s removed from its natural state. Pluck it and within hours it wilts even if you rush it to water, realizing that beauty must be admired and then left to be.

Stare Into the Poppy River represents that same reflection on the ephemeral nature of life. When beauty arrives we must stop – freeze almost – to witness and then let it be. It’s as if the memory we carry from that moment becomes the desired tangibility.

Stare Into the Poppy River mural by Josh Hunter

Stare Into the Poppy River mural by Josh Hunter

Stare Into the Poppy River mural by Josh Hunter

Stare Into the Poppy River mural by Josh Hunter

Stare Into the Poppy River mural by Josh Hunter

Stare Into the Poppy River mural by Josh Hunter

 

 

Parachute Factory Mural

Ephemeral art continues to grow in both influence and talent. Mindgruve, a local San Diego agency decided to pull this specific type of art form off the street and into their new building.

For weeks local artists breathed life into the blank walls, creating a unique gallery space to be shared with the public only once before the building’s renovation. Housing nearly 50 custom murals, the buzz of the historic building’s event began to circulate.

With a line wrapped around the block, doors opened and in spilled a hungry mass of individuals into a world of ingenuity and electro beats. The trained and untrained eye made their way around the multi-floor gallery, with Juxtapoz magazine coming down from LA to cover the event.

It became clear no one anticipated such a turnout as Karl Strauss kegs quickly became hollow cylinders and hundreds who had flocked were left lined up to view the space that couldn’t accommodate the overwhelming attendance.

Starting as a movement of local artists, the event metamorphosed into what became San Diego’s infamous one-night showing at the Parachute Factory.

“THE EXHIBITION’S TITLE references the venue’s former purpose as the old factory and headquarters for Pacific Parachute Co.—a San Diego manufacturing company that was started in 1942 by two African-American businessmen: Eddie “Rochester” Anderson, a famed comedian and actor, and Howard “Skippy” Smith, a skillful aviator during a time when only few African-Americans held pilots’ licenses. The company that the two men started would eventually go on to play an integral role in the manufacturing and distribution of parachutes for American paratroopers during WWII.

Unfortunately, along with the end of the war would also come the end for Pacific Parachute Co. In addition to its contributions for the war, the factory would also be remembered as a pioneer in promoting racially-integrated employment within the United States defense industry.” (www.wemakeparachutes.com)

The Parachute Factor, mural by Josh Hunter

The Parachute Factor, mural by Josh Hunter

Parachute Factory Mural (detail). by Josh Hunter

Parachute Factory Mural (detail). by Josh Hunter

Parachute Factory Mural (detail).

Parachute Factory Mural (detail).

Parachute Factory Mural (detail).

Parachute Factory Mural (detail).

Opening Night, The Parachute Factory. (Photo by Jessica Van)

Opening Night, The Parachute Factory. (Photo by Jessica Van)